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TRACKING THE BENEFITS OF A GRADUATE PROGRAM: MEASURING VALUE ADDED TO ONE’S OWN FOCUS AREAS OF DEVELOPMENT IN A GRADUATE PROGRAM

Jonathan W. Lankford

Abstract

Over the course of a doctoral program, the dissertation or capstone displays the ability of the graduate student to conduct research, interpret data, and even draw a warranted conclusion regarding a specified topic of interest to a target audience. The dissertation has been the traditional expression of doctoral-level knowledge and skill, but Peabody College at Vanderbilt University seems to have more of an appreciation for the capstone (Parks, 2016). To measure value added to the graduate student due to enrollment in a master’s or doctoral program, some universities require the submission of a competency report, which is a self-evaluation against the program learning outcomes that the student conducts at the beginning and at the end of the program. The American College of Education (ACE) requires a document of this nature, for example

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References

American College of Education. (2016a). Ed.D. and Ed.S. Program Outcomes.

American College of Education. (2016b). Module 1: Program, personal, and professional goals. LEAD6001: Introduction to Advanced Studies. Ed.D. and Ed.S. Program.

American College of Education. (2018). Catalog, volume 18. Retrieved from mhttp://ace.catalog.acalog.com

Breslow, L. (2007). Methods of measuring learning outcomes and value added. MIT Teaching and Learning Lab. Retrieved from http://tll.mit.edu/help/types-assessment-and-evaluation

Parks, D. J. (2016). Doctoral Research in Educational Leadership: Expectations for Those Thinking About An Advanced Degree. AASA Journal Of Scholarship & Practice, 12(4), 49-64.

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